Media and Communications

Every moment is full of messages. Consciously or unconsciously these messages influence our thinking, conversations and belief in what is possible. At Raising Voices, we strive to create positive media and communication tools that engage people in critical thinking and in the envisioning of nonviolent alternatives. In our messages, we aim to share a credible analysis, one that makes a convincing case within the local context. Through the following initiatives, we ensure messages flood the community on a scale and with a frequency that creates a lasting effect:




Multimedia Campaign

Nothing is more powerful in promoting public discourse than the media. Raising Voices works to harness this power through our inspiring multimedia campaign.

Our campaign, which started in 2008 and is followed by approximately two million Ugandans, fosters conversation and action on the issue of violence against children while promoting an understanding of children’s experiences of violence and the impact of violence on communities.

Creatively Communicating

The informal, stimulating and often humorous tone of the campaign has caught the attention of leaders, community members, teachers, ministry officials and of course, children! As we explore new ways of communicating and experiment with how to present provocative ideas in familiar channels, we use the following interrelated strategies to reach Ugandans:42images

  • A multifaceted campaign spread through radio, television, and newspaper channels aimed at creating a climate of collective reflection towards preventing violence against children.
  • A team of traveling activists who host community events, festivals, and information campaigns; show films, hold story-telling forums, school based discussion clubs, sponsored contests, and dramas.

The campaign has also received international accolades including winning the Communication for Social Change Award by the University of Queensland in Australia in 2012.

Radio Dramas

Based on the film “Through My Eyes”, the radio dramas are 30 minutes each and narrate true stories of four children’s experiences of violence. Each drama is a story about children’s ingenuity, resilience and humanity despite the violence they experience. Click on the titles below to download and listen to each of the dramas.27images

Downloads      
Amina’s Story Festus’ Story Ajara’ Story Deborah’s Story
Isaac’ Story Deno’s Story Sandra’s Story Juma’s Story

 

Radio Adverts

“This is what I think” is a 30 second radio adverts featuring voices of different individuals in the community sharing their ideas on what they think should be done to prevent violence against children. Click on the titles below to download and listen to each advert.

Downloads      
Advert #1 Advert #2 Advert #3 Advert #4
Advert #5 Advert #6 Advert #7 Advert #8
Advert #9 Advert #10 Advert #11 Advert #12

 

Radio Programs25images

“Voices” is a series of 9 radio programs articulating a perspective on what violence against children is, how often it happens, where it happens, who commits it, who experiences it and what should be done about it. “Voices” was aired in 10 radio stations in at least seven languages. Click on the titles below to download and listen to “Voices”.

Downloads  
Episode 1: Physical Violence Episode 2: Emotional Violence
Episode 3: Sexual Violence Episode 4: Economic Violence
Episode 5: Violence in Schools Episode 6: Why Violence Happens
Episode 7: How Violence Makes Children Feel Episode 8: Relationships With Children
Episode 9: What Can and Should be Done  

 

Advocacy Films

Will You Ever Forgive Me? documents four stories told from children’s perspectives. Each story focuses on a child’s struggle to make adults come face to face with the truth –that violence against children degrades everyone, including the perpetrator. As adults struggle to redeem themselves from the guilt of causing so much pain to the children, the children demonstrate that their spirits and imagination are larger than their short years of experience would lead us to believe. This is work of three talented Uganda-based film-makers and is inspired by true stories documented by Raising Voices. Order a copy here.

Watch  
Will You be My Mother? by Cyril Ducottet My Sweat, Whose Gain? by Irene Kulabako
Not My Body! by George Sengendo I forgive you! by Irene Kulabako

 

Through My Eyes is a 60 minute film divided into 4 segments of 15 minutes each telling four stories of children from different parts of Uganda. Each story is told from the child’s perspective and portrays their struggle to retain their dignity in the face of violence. All four stories are based on true events as reported to us. “Ajara” won an international prize at Verona International Festival.                                     

Watch  
Through My Eyes – Segment #1 – Amina Through My Eyes – Segment #2 – Festus
Through My Eyes – Segment #3 – Juma Through My Eyes – Segment #4 – Ajara

 

Adverts

“Time for Action is Now!” A series of 5 animated adverts of 45 seconds each is being aired on television in Uganda to influence individuals to reflect on the kind of relationship they create with children and take action to prevent violence against children. To view the adverts, please click the links below. To order copies, please click here.28images

Watch  
Time for Action is Now-Salon Time for Action is Now-Sarah Short
Time for Action is Now-Teacher Aggrey Time for Action is Now-Mechanic
Time for Action is Now-Reverend  

 

“This is what I think” 12 television adverts of 30 seconds each were aired on 3 stations over 1000 times in 2008. The adverts show different individuals in the community sharing their ideas on what they think should be done to prevent violence against children. Click on the links below to view the ads.

Downloads      
Advert #1 Advert #2 Advert #3 Advert #4
Advert #5 Advert #6 Advert #7 Advert #8
Advert #9 Advert #10 Advert #11 Advert #12

 

Animations: “What kind of relationship are you creating with children” A set of 5 animated television adverts to motivate individuals to think about the kind of relationships they are creating with children and how they can use their positions of power to prevent violence against children. Click on the options below to view the animations.

Watch  
Animation #1 Animation #2
Animation #3 Animation #4
Animation #5  

 

Newspapers

What is Your Promise?

The ‘What is your Promise?’ campaign provoked community members to think deeply about violence against children while challenging them to take action in big and small ways. What promise can you make to prevent VAC? Read more promises below.

Downloads      
Promise #1   Promise #2  
Promise #3   Promise #4  
Promise #5      

“I Have a Question” Campaign

This series of children’s questions were published on the front pages of the most popular weekly newspaper (The Weekly Observer) and other local newspapers for twenty weeks. To view the questions, click on the links below:

Question1        Question2

Downloads      
Cartoon #1 Cartoon #2 Cartoon #3 Cartoon #4
Cartoon #5 Cartoon #6 Cartoon #7 Cartoon #8
Cartoon #9 Cartoon #10    

 

Columns26images

“Voices on Violence” Weekly newspaper columns were written in five languages and published in all major newspapers in Uganda during the campaign, discussing violence against children. Click on the titles below to read the columns.

Downloads  
Column #1 – Physical Violence Column #2 – Emotional Violence
Column #3 – Sexual Violence Column #4 – Economic Violence
Column #5 – Why does it happen, teacher? Column #6 – Why does it happen, parent?
Column #7 – How do you feel when violence is committed against you? Column #8 – What kind of relationship do you want to create with children?
Column #9 – What should be done about violence against children?  

 

Cartoon Strips

“What is a Good school?” A series of 10 cartoon strips published in seven different newspapers in five different languages talking about good schools, what it takes to create them and who should be involved in creating them. Click on the titles below to view each cartoon strip.

WhatisaGoodSchool5

Downloads  
Cartoon #1 – What do you think? Cartoon #2 – Where teachers teach children to understand
Cartoon #3 – Where teachers build children’s self confidence Cartoon #4 – Where positive discipline means…
Cartoon #5 – Where education goes beyond the classroom and the school Cartoon #6 – Where everyone feels respected
Cartoon #7 – Where everyone participates Cartoon #8 – Where children respect, not fear teachers
Cartoon #9 – Where there is equality Cartoon #10 – What do you think?

 

“What kind of relationship are you creating with children” A series of 10 cartoon strips published weekly during the campaign in seven different local newspapers in five different languages to encourage individuals to think about the kind of relationship adults, including teachers, parents, and guardians create with children. View the cartoon strips here.

cartoon1

Downloads  
Cartoon #1 – What would a good father do? Cartoon #2 – What would a good teacher do?
Cartoon #3 – What would a good religious leader do? Cartoon #4 – What would a good community leader do?
Cartoon #5 – What would a good stepmother do? Cartoon #6 – What would a good police officer do?
Cartoon #7 – What would a good friend do? Cartoon #8 – What would a good neighbour do?
Cartoon #9 – What would you do? Cartoon #10 – Whatever you do…

 

“I care about children” A series of 10 cartoon strips published weekly in seven different local newspapers in five languages during the campaign challenging the reasons adults usually give to defend corporal punishment. These cartoon strips illustrate the consequences of corporal punishment and suggest positive ways of correcting children when they make mistakes instead of beating them. View the cartoon strips here:

1outof10

Downloads      
Cartoon #1 Cartoon #2 Cartoon #3 Cartoon #4
Cartoon #5 Cartoon #6 Cartoon #7 Cartoon #8
Cartoon #9 Cartoon #10    

 

Footprint Newspaper Campaign The footprint Campaign raised questions regarding the kind of legacy adults leave for children. Showing a foot in motion with messages printed on them, the advert triggered curiosity and inspired people to reflect on the issue of violence against children. View the foot print adverts here:

Screen Shot 2013-03-27 at 4.21.02 PM

Downloads
As a parent, what kind of footprint are you leaving in your child’s life?
As a teacher, what kind of footprint are you leaving in your student’s life?
As a father, what kind of footprint are you leaving in your child’s life?
As a mother, what kind of footprint are you leaving in your child’s life?
As a neighbor member, what kind of footprint are you leaving in children’s life?
As a community member, what kind of footprint are you leaving in children’s life?
As an uncle, what kind of footprint are you leaving in children’s life?
As an aunt, what kind of footprint are you leaving in children’s life?
As a religious leader, what kind of footprint are you leaving in children’s life?
As an LC, what kind of footprint are you leaving in children’s life?
As an MP, what kind of footprint are you leaving in children’s life?
As a president, what kind of footprint are you going to leave for the children of Uganda?
As a friend, what kind of footprint are you leaving in children’s life?
As a police officer, what of footprint are you leaving in children’s life?

Communication Materials

Raising Voices creates positive, engaging communication materials for violence prevention, and we believe in sharing our materials widely so that we can have a greater impact in the lives of women and communities.

A Culture of Sharing

Communication materials such as posters, stickers or flyers are some of the most powerful and provocative tools we can use in our activism. Communication materials can reflect community experiences, challenge common attitudes and behaviors, stimulate critical thinking and move people to take action! Our posters have been reproduced in more than 30 languages in over 50 countries.

All the designs of the communication materials on our website are free and available for non-profit use. Write to us requesting our simple Communication Materials Memorandum of Understanding which outlines the terms of use and adaptation. We provide print quality soft copies of requested materials and support partners through technical review and discussion.

“The [communication materials] training was very creative and tapped into the participant’s innovativeness. It enabled us to create materials, pre-test and adopt for use! It was practical!”
– Workshop Participant

Are you interested in using or adapting our communication materials? Contact us!

Impact

Operations Research

The national dialogue on violence against children is reaching more than 2 million Ugandans per month and has set VAC prevention as an important issue on the public agenda. In recent years, we have commissioned two monitoring studies to assess the effect of the media campaign in Western, Central and Eastern regions of Uganda. Through these studies, we have gained a credible understanding of how many people our campaign reached and how it reached them.

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The feedback we have received from monitoring our media and communications efforts has clearly indicated that the campaign is successfully cultivating a culture of questioning and is shifting the social acceptability of violence against children. This is shaping a new generation of relationships between children and adults.

chart1 chart2 chart3

 In 2012 alone, we…

  • Published 155 cartoon strips
  • Printed 155 handprints in the newspaper
  • Published 24 front page “earpiece” stories
  • Aired 19,800 info spots on 21 radio stations
  • Aired 265 radio shows
  • Aired 175 live radio talk shows
  • Aired 150 storytelling programs
  • Televised 3,960 info spots
  • Televised 40 TV shows
  • Held 32 film screenings and discussions
  • Distributed 4,000 handprint stickers

Impact on public discourse

Using multimedia publications, infomercials and programs, SMS campaigns, and community activism activities, we work to inspire and celebrate activism among individuals and spark dialogue, recognizing that individual actions can create collective change.

“From your television and radio dramas, I have learnt that the upbringing of children is everyone’s responsibility and it is the community to come and take over. I have learnt that these children have their rights and it is us the parents who have to give them a platform to exercise their rights.” –Parent/Guardian

“In the beginning when I had not heard about these teachings of not beating children, I used to cane a lot but when I heard about these messages, I changed my attitude of beating children. I resorted to mutual understanding where I sit down with them and we have a talk. I realized that these young children also have big ideas, so it is wise to listen to them.” –Parent/Guardian

“The film was so powerful. I could really feel the children’s suffering and now I know I cannot ignore it any longer.” –Film screening participant

Recognition

We have also been honored with international and local awards for our work including the International Communication for Social Change Award from the University of Queensland in Australia in 2011 and the local Nambi Initiative Award in Uganda in 2011.

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